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SUMMARY

Below is just a small sample of courses you’ll take as a Public Policy major at Jessup. This list is not a guide for course selection. It was created to give you a peek at the program’s academic offerings. For official program requirements, please see the current course catalog.

Major Courses (15 Units)

The following courses are part of the requirement for this major and are recommended to fulfill general education requirements.

This course provides a survey of the major concepts of macroeconomics, which include an examination of GDP, the business cycle, unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, the national debt, foreign exchange and international trade. The Federal Reserve, banking system and interest rates will also be explored along with the economics of developing nations. Thus, this course provides both a U.S. and International focus regarding the study of macroeconomics.

This course provides a survey of the study of microeconomics for individuals and business managers with a focus on major economic concepts from a Christ-centered perspective. This course will include an examination of the principles of scarcity, supply, demand, elasticity, price, production, strategy and other important elements of microeconomics relevant to making effective economic decisions for households and firms. In addition, this course will relate macroeconomic concepts which pertain to individuals and firms. Economists who have significantly contributed to the field of economics will also be examined.

COMM180 | Speech
Study of the basic principles and methods of public speaking.

PSYC222 | Interpersonal Processes
A study of the elements of effective communication. Increasing self-awareness and improving personal effectiveness are emphasized. Consideration of cultural traditions as they impact communication styles is included.

This course will trace the political, constitutional, cultural, and socio-economic history of the United States from the colonial period to the present day. In addition, this course will also treat the political, socio-economic and cultural history of the state of California. Particular attention will be paid to the themes identified in The History – Social Science Framework of California Public Schools.

A survey of philosophy from the pre-Socratics to postmodernism, with emphasis on epistemology, ontology, ethics, and the relationship of human critical thinking to biblical revelation.

Core Courses (44-45 Units)

This course provides a historical and institutional review of American government, tracing its development following the Revolutionary War and Constitutional Convention to its modern structures. The course will provide an overview of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches as well as governmental agencies and institutions within and outside these branches.

An introduction to political theory and philosophy, this course surveys classic and modern thinkers and writings that provide the context for and development of contemporary political thought, structures, and society. The course provides foundational principles of American government and politics and for a comparative study of governments and politics worldwide.

This course provides an overview of U.S. political processes in the executive, judicial, and legislative branches with an emphasis in electoral process. The course will also provide an introduction to specific administrative processes, between branches and within agencies. Students will develop an understanding of how political structures develop and implement policy.

This course is intended to serve as an undergraduate introduction to the study and practice of public administration. Although the field has a shorter history than other social sciences, gaining a perspective on the way in which it has developed helps to understand the current practice of administering the public’s business. It is also important to understand the broader social and political environment within which public administration functions as well as the dynamics of behavior within large organizations. Indeed, to be successful, a well-trained administrator must have a clear grasp of the continuing issues that have shaped the field since its inception.

Biblical principles and ethical standards provide the basis for an understanding of Christian policymaking. This course provides a review and discussion of the moral and ethical standards and conduct for public sector leadership and service. Coursework includes a review of biblical teaching on ethics, other prominent writings on ethics principles and ethical practices, and application of such principles and practices to a modern ethics issue or case study.

This course provides an overview of California state and local government. The course examines the major state offices and their bureaucracies, the California state legislature and budget process, and local governments. This course will establish an understanding of how state government works and interacts with county and city governments, and the role of the players and policies that influence and are influenced by state and local government.

A survey of the major modern political and governmental systems, the course will review varying political regimes as well as compare Western and Eastern governmental systems. The course will also provide a comparative review of the major political and governmental systems around the globe – democracy, monarchy, communist/Marxist, theocracy—with a specific study of Great Britain, Russia, China, India, Iran, Nigeria, and Mexico.

An introduction to the principles of micro- and macroeconomics, this course reviews both the principles of economic theory and application, as well as a comparative review of economic practices. The course includes an analysis of supply and demand, allocation of resources, and economic aggregates. The course also emphasizes the significance of economic policies as they relate to political policymaking.

This course covers the major administrative theories that drive macro-level public behavior. The course will discuss the significance of the study of public administration, how theorists and practitioners have sought to develop formal perspectives on public management that have constructed an integrated perspective on public management. The course will examine a range of management issues and strategies within the context of managing public organizations including the day-to-day dilemmas faced by competent public managers.

The Constitution is the Supreme Law of the United States and provides the foundation for the laws, processes and structures of our government and political system. This course will provide an understanding of the major provisions of this document as they relate to American government and politics. The course will also highlight the rights and responsibilities of citizens and residents, and introduce civil rights protected by the Constitution and related legislation.

This course studies the institutions that conduct international relations and/or implement international policy, and the issues that inform those policies. The course will review governmental bodies such as the U.S. State Department, as well as intergovernmental organizations, particularly the United Nations, and how they address current international issues. The course will also highlight nongovernmental international organizations and major international documents and protections related to international human rights.

Senior year program of activity in public policy field. Involves field supervision and a faculty advisor. Interns will complete a regimen of assigned tasks and written reports.

Students will learn basic methods to research and compile statistical, historical, and legal data for policy analysis. The course will provide working examples and opportunities to apply research methods to current policy issues.

A capstone course, the purpose of this senior seminar is to provide intensive analysis and practical application of the public policy issues and institutions studied in the first through third year curriculum for Public Policy, Criminal Justice, and Public Administration. The senior seminar will survey major policy areas and provide focused discussion of policy topics of the day through the lens of the student’s own leadership trajectory as explored and identified by themselves and their peers. The course culminates in a focused study of a policy topic to be selected by the student.

This course is offered by the Career and Life Planning (CLP) office. It supports the campus-wide initiative of the office which is to help WJU students and alumni be prepared for the world of work upon graduation and to become “exceptionally employable.” In this course, students will engage in discovering their values, interests, and strengths as they relate to their major and career options. The course is designed as an extensive opportunity to deepen students’ understanding of self and apply that knowledge within career planning. Students will use an array of self-assessments and career exploration tools to research and identify careers and academic options and to create an action plan for attaining vocational goals.

This course is offered by the Career and Life Planning office (CLP) for juniors and seniors. CLP exists to help WJU students and alumni be prepared for the world of work upon graduation and to become exceptionally employable. This course supports this campus-wide initiative. This course will engage students to demonstrate and practice all of the steps associated with institutional internship requirements and practical tools to use within the job search process. Course topics include, but are not limited to, self-assessment, occupational research, goal setting, resume writing, cover letter writing, internship resources and procedures, social media reputation management, portfolio creation, and interviewing strategies.

Public Policy Concentrations

Students must choose a concentration listed below.

Criminal Justice Concentration (12 units)

Choose four courses from the following:

Overview of criminal justice system, including historical development, present status, and suggested reforms. Includes detailed descriptions of the duties and functions of actors in the criminal justice system, including: victim, offender, police, prosecuting and defense attorneys, courts and corrections. Will elaborate criminal justice processes from the formation of laws to the final stages of the treatment of criminals, including a section on juvenile offenders.

The criminal law course discusses the creation and application of substantive criminal law. It includes the nature and origins of criminal law, substantive due process, elements of criminal liability, the doctrine of complicity, uncomplicated crimes, defenses to criminal liability, and the elements of crimes against persons, property and public order.

This course provides an overview of the nature and causes of crime and criminal behavior. The course reviews the characteristics of the offender and categories of crime ranging from white collar crime to violent crimes. The course also introduces foundational elements of the criminal justice system, including theories of sentencing and measurements of crime as well as the procedures and actors.

The broad objectives of this course are to (1) provide students with a basic understanding of the role(s) that police play in American society; (2) expose students to the often conflicting issues that police officers confront; (3) familiarize students with empirical research on police behavior and evaluation research on the impact of different police tactics; and (4) teach students how to assess the quality of research.

Introduces the student to the field of corrections and its role in the criminal justice process. Major topics include: organization of correctional systems; correctional role; institutional operations; alternatives to institutionalization; treatment and rehabilitation, and current and future issues.

As an introduction to forensics for criminal justice students, this course provides an overview of the role of the forensic scientist in the criminal justice system. They course surveys foundational principles of forensic science, balancing the necessary theoretical knowledge needed to understand the subject with an emphasis on the practical tools and techniques needed to apply the material in real life situations.

This course systematically examines political violence, responses by government institutions to that violence and implications of both for the administration of justice. Content is structured along a continuum, ranging from small-scale violence to mass violence – assassinations, terrorism by sub-national and transnational organizations, state terror, and genocide. In recent years political violence has progressively drawn the American governmental institutions, particularly justice agencies into the global picture of violence committed by both domestic and international terrorists. Theoretical approaches to the study of terrorism and analysis of terrorist theory and strategies will be covered as well. Additionally, the course examines the Bible, and historical causes of terrorism, and examines other religions, primarily Judaism and Islam.

The study of the impact of the social context on the individual, this course examines the relationship of the individual to the family, the group, and the larger social milieu. Both theory and research findings will be examined as students analyze social behavior, including social cognition, attitude formation and change, conformity, prejudice, and group processes.

Students will explore cultural differences and develop greater sensitivity to these differences as they influence human behavior and mental processes. Psychological dynamics involved in the formation and reduction of prejudices, discrimination, and stereotypes will be explored.

A study of psychopathology or abnormal behavior. Emphasis is placed on description and identification of individual disorders. A consideration of cultural differences in the expression of abnormal symptomatology is included.

This course is designed to explore the psychological, physiological, and societal effects of addiction. Students will be introduced to a variety of addictions and drug classifications; gender, ethnic and cultural differences regarding addiction; psychological and physiological effects of a variety of drugs; and the part that family and society play in addiction, treatment, and rehabilitation.

A study of theory, research, and practice relevant to the reciprocal relationships between individuals and the social systems which constitute the community context. Special emphasis will be placed on management and administration of community agencies providing social services including mental health, corrections, chemical dependency, and child/adolescent treatment services. Legal and ethical issues in the administration of these agencies will be included.

Public Administration Concentration (12 units)

Choose four courses from the following:

This course analyzes the development and modern practice of presidential leadership in the United States. The course examines the evolution of the modern presidency, the process of presidential selection, and the structure of the presidency as an institution. The ways in which presidents make decisions and seek to shape foreign, economic, and domestic policy will be assessed and the relationships of the presidency with other major governmental institutions, organized interest groups, the media, and the public will be explored. The course also explores the reach of the President’s ability to influence policy and decision-making. Prerequisite: American Government preferred.

This course provides an introduction to the context, theory, process, and practice of state and local economic development policy. The objectives of the course are 1) to provide an introduction to the concepts, ideas, and strategies employed in the pursuit of economic development; 2) to review basic principles for critically examining alternative development policies and programs; 3) to reflect on the goals and objectives of economic development efforts; 4) to examine the economic, political, and social context in which development policymaking occurs; 5) to survey and critically review the range of strategies commonly used to improve the economic prospects of neighborhoods, cities, and regions; and 6) to hone your ability to critically analyze and present your analysis in a variety of mediums.

This course is an introductory course in government budgeting and finance, dealing with public revenue and expenditure policies, financial management, and politics of the budgetary process. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theories, concepts, and practice of government budgeting and finance and to expose them to the current issues and challenges in this field.

The administrative law process, concentrating upon the functions and procedures of federal and state administrative agencies and upon judicial review of agency actions. Specific topics include the constitutional position of administrative agencies, the availability and scope of judicial review, legislative and executive control of administrative discretion, the administrative power to investigate, the process of decision within the agency, and the constitutional right to an administrative hearing.

An overview of the business applications of various useful statistical methods, concepts, and business tools. Topics include: an introduction to business statistics and ethics, descriptive statistics, discrete and continuous random sampling, distributions and confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, comparing means and proportions, regression analysis, model building, and decision theory. This course is required for all business majors.

This course provides a survey of the major concepts of macroeconomics, which include an examination of GDP, the business cycle, unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, the national debt, foreign exchange and international trade. The Federal Reserve, banking system and interest rates will also be explored along with the economics of developing nations. Thus, this course provides both a U.S. and International focus regarding the study of macroeconomics.

This course provides a survey of the study of microeconomics for individuals and business managers with a focus on major economic concepts from a Christ-centered perspective. This course will include an examination of the principles of scarcity, supply, demand, elasticity, price, production, strategy and other important elements of microeconomics relevant to making effective economic decisions for households and firms. In addition, this course will relate macroeconomic concepts which pertain to individuals and firms. Economists who have significantly contributed to the field of economics will also be examined.

A general explanation of the law including its sources, development, and terminology. Specific legal doctrines and principles that affect business including an introduction to contracts, legal documents, and property are covered. Business organizations such as corporations and partnerships are described.

An introduction to the concepts of effective communication. It will enhance communication in building teams and in other organizational settings and addresses important interpersonal exchange issues, such as conflict resolution.

A general explanation of the analysis of marketing opportunities; planning of marketing programs with emphasis on product, price, promotion and distribution; control of the marketing effort; social and ethical responsibilities of marketing.

This is an upper-division introductory course in corporate (managerial) finance designed for undergraduate students majoring in business. This class explores the foundational principles and practices necessary to be an effective financial manager of a for-profit firm. Topics include industry ethics, the role of financial institutions and markets in finance, cash management and planning, financial statement reporting and ratio analysis, debt and equity usage, capital budgeting, leverage and capital structure fundamentals, dividend payout policy formation, and other relevant topics in managerial finance.

A study of management functions and practices in an international context; comparison of management and business practices from various political and cultural perspectives; emphasis on what managers need to be aware of in order to perform in the international environment.

A study of the theories and practices of human resource management; strategies to secure, develop and maintain a productive workforce; job analysis, work design, HR planning, recruitment, selection, training, evaluation, compensation and benefits, EEO, OSHA, labor relations, employee rights and discipline.

General Concentration (9 units)

Choose nine units of electives from any of the concentrations.

Government and Politics Concentration (12 units)

Choose four courses from the following:

This course offers a review of legislative process on the state and federal levels. The course will trace the process of how a measure or bill becomes law in the United States and California and how those processes may compare or contrast. The course will also highlight key bills currently on the legislative agenda, and offer students opportunities to discuss and debate bills in legislative sessions.

This course analyzes the development and modern practice of presidential leadership in the United States. The course examines the evolution of the modern presidency, the process of presidential selection, and the structure of the presidency as an institution. The ways in which presidents make decisions and seek to shape foreign, economic, and domestic policy will be assessed and the relationships of the presidency with other major governmental institutions, organized interest groups, the media, and the public will be explored. The course also explores the reach of the President’s ability to influence policy and decision-making. Prerequisite: American Government preferred.

Campaign Organizing is a course that teaches students the process, strategies, and implementation of political campaigns. The course will cover various types of campaigns including for public office and for ballot measures. The course will also distinguish specific approaches and concerns for local, state, and national campaigns. In addition, the course will relate various players such as media and interest groups that have an impact on political campaigns.

This course examines critical social concerns and their impact on U.S. legal and social policy. The course will highlight both the biblical context and the historical and modern laws addressing significant social issues such as marriage, education, and health. Constitution, civil rights and senior seminar topics will be included for course discussion and review.

The broad objectives of this course are to (1) provide students with a basic understanding of the role(s) that police play in American society; (2) expose students to the often conflicting issues that police officers confront; (3) familiarize students with empirical research on police behavior and evaluation research on the impact of different police tactics; and (4) teach students how to assess the quality of research.

This course studies the development of American Foreign Policy from the post-Revolutionary to the post-9/11 era. The course reviews the significant milestones of American foreign policy and examines the implications for current policies and international relations. The course will highlight economic and military policies of key Presidents and as well as those instituted by Congress.

This course studies the development of American Foreign Policy from the post-Revolutionary to the post-9/11 era. The course reviews the significant milestones of American foreign policy and examines the implications for current policies and international relations. The course will highlight economic and military policies of key Presidents and as well as those instituted by Congress.

This course systematically examines political violence, responses by government institutions to that violence and implications of both for the administration of justice. Content is structured along a continuum, ranging from small-scale violence to mass violence – assassinations, terrorism by sub-national and transnational organizations, state terror, and genocide. In recent years political violence has progressively drawn the American governmental institutions, particularly justice agencies into the global picture of violence committed by both domestic and international terrorists. Theoretical approaches to the study of terrorism and analysis of terrorist theory and strategies will be covered as well. Additionally, the course examines the Bible, and historical causes of terrorism, and examines other religions, primarily Judaism and Islam.

This course provides an in-depth review of the First Amendment of the US Constitution. The course includes an overview of each element of the First Amendment including: Freedom of Speech, Press, Assembly (and derived freedom of Association) as well as the Free Exercise of Religion and the Establishment Clause. The course will examine related legislation, case law, church and political history, and current news and policy issues. The course will discuss the interrelationship of the First Amendment with other rights and responsibilities imbedded in the US and state constitutions as well as related statutory law. The course will also engage students in focused debate on current topics relating to the specific elements of the First Amendment.

ENGL231 | American Literature to 1865
A survey covering significant literary works in American literature from its beginnings through the end of the Civil War period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama.

ENGL232 | American Literature 1865 to Present
A survey covering significant literary works in American literature from the end of the Civil War period to present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama.

This course will take an in-depth look at the interaction of Christianity and Islam from the conquests of Mohammed in the Middle East through the current world-wide struggle arising from a newly resurgent and often militant Islam. The course will explore the historical, cultural and theological aspects of this interaction between two of the world’s great monotheistic faiths.

This course will survey California history from exploration to the present day. Contemporary issues in California’s economy, ecology and society will also be examined.

This course is an objective study of world religions including Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and traditional religions. Discussions include the exclusivity of Christianity in a pluralistic society and strategic opportunities for apologetic and evangelistic engagement with adherents of other religions. Efforts are made to discover bridges of approach for sharing the uniqueness of Christ.

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