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SUMMARY

Below is just a small sample of courses you’ll take as a Psychology major at Jessup. This list is not a guide for course selection. It was created to give you a peek at the program’s academic offerings. For official program requirements, please see the current course catalog.

Major Courses (14 Units)

The following courses are part of the requirement for this major and are recommended to fulfill general education requirements.

An introduction to the study of human behavior and mental processes. The history of psychology and basic theories of learning, motivation, personality, and emotion are explored. Application of psychology to everyday living is emphasized.

An overview of physical, cognitive, psychosocial, and moral development of humankind from prenatal life through old age. This class should be taken early in the student’s training as it is prerequisite to many other courses.

A study of the elements of effective communication. Increasing self-awareness and improving personal effectiveness are emphasized. Consideration of cultural traditions as they impact communication styles is included.

BIOL101/L | Principles of Biology with Lab
Introduces biological principles that underlie the cellular basis of life. Course topics include biomolecules, cell structure and function, cellular energetics, molecular conveyance of information, cell division, reproduction, development, and genetic inheritance. Students will learn and apply scientific skills, approaches, and strategies to solve problems and to interpret observations in both lecture and lab.

BIOL225/L | Human Anatomy with Lab
Examines structure, relationships among structures, and histology of the human body through a rigorous study of human anatomy.

BIOL246/L | Human Physiology
Explores the function, regulation, and homeostasis of systems in the human body. Experiments on nonliving systems, blood and circulation, muscle, nervous system and sense organs, ion balance and fluid environment, endocrines, respiration, and digestion.

 

Core Courses (41 Units)

Students will be introduced to the nature of persons from a Christian world view, while considering the nature and process of the application of Christian thought to the study and practice of psychology. An examination of the practice of responsible integration will be included.

An exploration of man’s relational nature as it reflects God’s relational nature. Health in a variety of relational contexts will be explored. Self-awareness as well as implications for ministry to others will be emphasized.

An introduction to basic theories of personality and their application in therapeutic contexts, this class includes an analysis of the credibility of each theory from a Christian perspective. Legal and ethical issues, including reporting requirements in abusive situations, are included. This is a writing intensive course for the psychology major.

Students will explore cultural differences and develop greater sensitivity to these differences as they influence human behavior and mental processes. Psychological dynamics involved in the formation and reduction of prejudices, discrimination, and stereotypes will be explored.

An examination of the biopsychosocial science of human sexuality. This course provides students with an opportunity to explore complex sexual issues. Designed to help participants become more comfortable with discussing sexuality, the course emphasizes increased self-awareness and provides direction for working with sexual issues in others.

A study of psychopathology or abnormal behavior. Emphasis is placed on description and identification of individual disorders. A consideration of cultural differences in the expression of abnormal symptomatology is included.

This course is designed to enhance the student’s understanding of scientific research methodology as it is applied to the science of psychology. The focus of this course is on developing the student’s knowledge and skills in scientific methodology, ethics, research processes, experimental design, qualitative strategies, and APA style.

Organized topically, this course will provide a current and comprehensive overview of psychological learning theory. It examines the theoretical and empirical research related to learning, memory, attention, problem solving, concept formation and language. Additionally, it will also review controversies that have developed as our understanding of human learning has developed and will explore the implications of these various theories.

This course is a comprehensive study of the neuroanatomy correlates of behavior as seen in the interplay of structure and function: cellular and systemic biological integration, molecular biology, epigenetics, advances in imaging technology, plasticity, and the big-picture emphasis of normal and abnormal behavior correlation. Students will delve deeper into such questions as: why do we have a brain, and how did God design it? How is the nervous system organized? How do drugs affect our behavior? How does the brain learn? How does the brain think?

The student will be expected to work in an agency/setting congruent with their psychology concentration. Cross-cultural, educational, mental health, correctional, or related placements may be approved, depending upon the concentration chosen by the student. Supervision on site as well as group supervision on campus will be a part of field work. Field Work in Psychology will be taken the senior year. All required course work must be concurrent with or prerequisite to Field Work in Psychology.

As the senior capstone experience for psychology majors, this course provides the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to integrate coursework from the breadth of the entire program. This course should be taken in the final semester of the senior year, and it includes a comprehensive exam.

PSYC203 | Social Psychology
The study of the impact of the social context on the individual, this course examines the relationship of the individual to the family, the group, and the larger social milieu. Both theory and research findings will be examined as students analyze social behavior, including social cognition, attitude formation and change, conformity, prejudice, and group processes.

PSYC460 | Professional Skills
Student will develop an understanding of the legal and ethical requirements of practice in the field of addiction counseling. The foundational legalities of a counseling practice such as confidentiality as well as those specific to drug and alcohol counselors will be explored. Personal and professional growth issues will be discussed including stress management. Additionally, advanced and applied counseling skills for substance abuse and addiction will be explored and developed.

PSYC331 | Counseling Skills
The appropriate use of techniques and strategies in counseling provides the core focus for this class. Skills to assess need, provide appropriate interventions, and use relevant referrals will be included. This practical course emphasizes demonstration and application.

 

Psychology Concentrations

Students must choose a concentration listed below.

General Psychology Concentration (12 units)

Choose any electives
The general psychology concentration is directed toward students who desire preparation in the field of psychology but, because of their unique career interests, goals, or life needs, are best served by selecting courses throughout the concentration.

Counseling Psychology Concentration (12 units)

A psychologically and theologically integrated study of marriage and family relationships, this course prepares students to develop a personal philosophy of family. It will include a personal evaluation of familial experiences and a challenging look at cultural norms and biblical principles. This course prepares students to develop a personal conceptualization for family development in addition to aiding others to do the same.

An integrated and experiential study of effective small group dynamics from both a psychological as well as a theological perspective. Students will become familiar with the stages in the development of small groups, gaining insights and skills to become effective small group members and leaders.

This course is designed to explore the psychological, physiological, and societal effects of addiction. Students will be introduced to a variety of addictions and drug classifications; gender, ethnic and cultural differences regarding addiction; psychological and physiological effects of a variety of drugs; and the part that family and society play in addiction, treatment, and rehabilitation.

An experiential examination of the elements of therapeutic, growth-oriented grieving. The effective journey into, through, and out of the loss experience is explored from a personal as well as a ministerial perspective. This interactive course is designed to provide the student with a model informed by scripture and psychological theory/research for incorporating grieving skills into his/her current life and for helping others do the same.

Developmental Psychology Concentration (12 units)

A psychologically and theologically integrated study of marriage and family relationships, this course prepares students to develop a personal philosophy of family. It will include a personal evaluation of familial experiences and a challenging look at cultural norms and biblical principles. This course prepares students to develop a personal conceptualization for family development in addition to aiding others to do the same.

An in-depth look at the development of children and adolescents. Guidance and practical parenting skills as well as therapeutic interventions will be emphasized. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own development and the experiences in childhood and adolescence that have shaped their lives.

An exploration of a scriptural view of male and female identity and roles, this course is designed to expand the student’s perspective regarding gender differences and similarities. The impact of culture upon men and women socially, physically, and spiritually will be examined. Issues unique to each gender will be explored with the goal of preparing students for working more effectively with both men and women.

An experiential examination of the elements of therapeutic, growth-oriented grieving. The effective journey into, through, and out of the loss experience is explored from a personal as well as a ministerial perspective. This interactive course is designed to provide the student with a model informed by scripture and psychological theory/research for incorporating grieving skills into his/her current life and for helping others do the same.

Community Mental Health Concentration (12 units)

The study of the impact of the social context on the individual, this course examines the relationship of the individual to the family, the group, and the larger social milieu. Both theory and research findings will be examined as students analyze social behavior, including social cognition, attitude formation and change, conformity, prejudice, and group processes.

This course is designed to explore the psychological, physiological, and societal effects of addiction. Students will be introduced to a variety of addictions and drug classifications; gender, ethnic and cultural differences regarding addiction; psychological and physiological effects of a variety of drugs; and the part that family and society play in addiction, treatment, and rehabilitation.

A study of theory, research, and practice relevant to the reciprocal relationships between individuals and the social systems which constitute the community context. Special emphasis will be placed on management and administration of community agencies providing social services including mental health, corrections, chemical dependency, and child/adolescent treatment services. Legal and ethical issues in the administration of these agencies will be included.

The study and practice of human assistance to the frail, needy, and disenfranchised within the broader social context. Students will be introduced to the theories of social welfare, the principles and practices of social work, and effective social interventions to individuals, families, groups, and larger community systems. The course is skills-based and it is expected that students will practice and develop rudimentary competency in the 12 core skills of social work practice.

International Psychology Concentration (12 units)

The study of the impact of the social context on the individual, this course examines the relationship of the individual to the family, the group, and the larger social milieu. Both theory and research findings will be examined as students analyze social behavior, including social cognition, attitude formation and change, conformity, prejudice, and group processes.

An introduction to the science of the study of man in his cultural setting. The end in view is the gaining of a better understanding of different customs and cultures to enable more effective cross-cultural communication.

An introduction to how culture affects the process of intercultural communication with practical experience as a high contrast cultural partnership. Understanding is the priority as students look at the vast varieties of worldviews, customs, attitudes, values, belief systems, and behaviors which culture includes. Enhanced communication of the Christian gospel is cross-culturally is one expected outcome.

This course is an objective study of world religions including Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and traditional religions. Discussions include the exclusivity of Christianity in a pluralistic society and strategic opportunities for apologetic and evangelistic engagement with adherents of other religions. Efforts are made to discover bridges of approach for sharing the uniqueness of Christ.

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