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SUMMARY

Below is just a small sample of courses you’ll take as a Music major at Jessup. This list is not a guide for course selection. It was created to give you a peek at the program’s academic offerings. For official program requirements, please see the current course catalog.

Major Courses (6 Units)

The following courses are part of the requirement for this major and are recommended to fulfill general education requirements.

Covers the historical development, forms, composers, performers, styles and genres of Western music from Antiquity through the Baroque period of music. Listening and analysis activities will enrich students’ understanding of each period’s traditions and innovations. Students will become familiar with primary composers, musical forms, and artistic developments in social and historical contexts.

Covers the historical development, forms, composers, performers, styles and genres of Western music from the Pre-Classical period through contemporary composers. Listening and analysis activities will enrich students’ understanding of each period’s traditions and innovations. Students will become familiar with primary composers, musical forms, and artistic developments in social and historical contexts.

Core Courses (39 Units)

Class instruction in the development of a basic proficiency in piano. Emphasis is on note and rhythm reading, repertoire, sight reading, scales, and basic chord progressions. May be repeated for credit.

A study of the basic harmonic, melodic and rhythmic components of music. Included in the course content will be scales, keys, triads, inversions, transposition, counterpoint, chord progressions, and non-harmonic tones.

A review of diatonic theory, and an introduction to dominant and non-dominant seventh chords, ninth, eleventh and other expanded harmonies, figured bass, Sonata Allegro and other forms, secondary dominants, keyboard harmony, and analysis.

Continuation of class instruction in the development of a basic proficiency in piano. Emphasis is on expanded note and rhythm reading, advancing repertoire, sight reading, scales, and chord progressions. May be repeated for credit.

A skills acquisition course covering sight singing, melodic intervallic, rhythmic and basic choral identification, reading, and dictation.

A skills acquisition course covering sight singing, melodic intervallic, rhythmic and basic choral identification, reading, and dictation.

A skills acquisition course covering sight singing, melodic intervallic, rhythmic and basic choral identification, reading, and dictation.

A skills acquisition course covering sight singing, melodic intervallic, rhythmic and basic choral identification, reading, and dictation.

An introduction to the basic skills and techniques of conducting: beat patterns, subdivisions, cues, releases, terminology, score preparation and preparatory gestures.

A survey of the music of the non-western world, including selected areas from Africa, Asia, and South America.

A more advanced look at diatonic theory, and dominant and non-dominant seventh chords, ninth, eleventh and other expanded harmonies, figured bass, Sonata Allegro and other forms, secondary dominants, keyboard harmony, and analysis.

A continuation of advanced theory.

Master Works provides students with performance group experience centered in traditional choral repertoire. The group emphasis is on rehearsal and performance of works drawn from the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary periods of music. The Master Works Chorale is open to all William Jessup University students regardless of major. The Chorale performs approximately three times each semester.

Students will be placed in a music ministry internship with a local congregation. Under supervision, they will apply the skills and knowledge acquired in the major to practical ministry situations.

Music Majors are required to present in the senior year a senior recital of 45 minutes to one hour prior to graduation. Students will register for M498 during the semester of their scheduled recital.

Music Concentrations

Students must choose a concentration listed below.

Commercial Music Concentration (13 units)

In this course, students study analog and digital electronic sound synthesis, theory of synthesizer operation; programming new sounds, computer applications including sequencing, patch libraries and programming aids, musical instrument digital interface (MIDI) and its applications, drum machines, and sampling sound synthesis.

Recording and Production covers basic acoustics review, mixers, microphones, monitoring systems, studio acoustics, digital recording techniques, mixing concepts, outboard effects, and acoustic and synth recording basics.

The intent of this class is to work in production teams to produce a musical recording project. Each team includes students oriented towards arranging, engineering, music business, and performance. They take on a large project, divide the production tasks, and learn to work as a production team. Topics include session and arrangement planning, budgeting, contracting, preproduction techniques, recording of acoustic and electronic instruments, work process and synchronization, final mix, and mastering. Students are given a budget and use realistic figures for studio time, musicians, CD costs, etc. This is meant to be a shared project, with each student contributing particular skills and orientation to the final product, which can be used as a demonstration of the student’s abilities and capacity for working in a production team. As a final step, each student evaluates others on the same production team.

This course is part of the commercial music emphasis core. Students study careers in commercial music, journals of the business, and networking and career development, and receive an overview of the production process for music and post production and an introduction to A&R, touring, contracting, copyright law, licenses, royalties, mechanicals, publishing and distribution, performing rights organizations, contracts, legal issues, etc.

An introduction to orchestration. Students will develop scoring skills for orchestral, symphonic and wind ensemble instruments. Scoring for full ensembles and for smaller combinations typical in school and church settings will be emphasized.

Music Composition Concentration (12 units)

In this course, students study analog and digital electronic sound synthesis, theory of synthesizer operation; programming new sounds, computer applications including sequencing, patch libraries and programming aids, musical instrument digital interface (MIDI) and its applications, drum machines, and sampling sound synthesis.

An introduction to orchestration. Students will develop scoring skills for orchestral, symphonic and wind ensemble instruments. Scoring for full ensembles and for smaller combinations typical in school and church settings will be emphasized.

This course will study the forms of music from the 18th century to present day, including an analysis of both large and small forms, rondo, sonata, and other symphonic forms.

This course includes writing of original hymns, choruses, binary and ternary forms, leading into larger classical forms.

A study of strict and free counterpoint in two, three, and four parts. The class will focus on analysis of music and writing music using contrapuntal techniques with emphasis on forms of the Baroque era and their current application.

General Concentration (12 units)

Choose 12 units of music electives not found in the music core requirements. This concentration is intended for transfer students.

Music Education Concentration (12 units)

This course offers beginning instruction in the woodwind instruments. Careful focus is given to tone production, technique, instrument care, study materials, and teaching procedures.

The course offers beginning instruction in the stringed instruments. Careful focus is given to tone production, bowing, technique, study materials, instrument care and teaching procedures.

Students receive elementary instruction in the brass instruments. Careful consideration is given to tone production, technique, care of instruments, study materials, and teaching procedures.

This course provides elementary instruction in the percussion instruments. Careful consideration is given to technique, care of instruments, study materials, and teaching procedures.

Continued development of conducting techniques, rehearsal strategies, and repertoire selection.

Students will develop and apply knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the voice with the methods, curriculum, materials and procedures of teaching. Students will participate in observed teaching situations with an assigned voice student.

This course addresses philosophical understanding of the foundations of music education paired with practical application of the principles of the psychology of music in the classroom.

Performance Concentration (11 units)

Music Majors are required to present in the junior year a recital of one hour (minimum length) prior to continuation. Students will register for MUS398 during the semester of their scheduled recital.

Continued development of conducting techniques, rehearsal strategies, and repertoire selection.

Students will develop and apply knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the voice with the methods, curriculum, materials and procedures of teaching. Students will participate in observed teaching situations with an assigned voice student.

Worship Concentration (12 units)

This course provides basic instruction for acquiring skills in a worship arts team, including musical excellence, worship leadership and music directing, building basic skills in building, coordinating and directing a worship team.

This course provides more advanced instruction for leading a worship arts team with musical excellence, worship leadership and music directing, composing chord charts, lead sheets and vocals in arranging music for worship teams, and integrating a variety of musical styles to minister to a multicultural society.

This course is a forum for integrating contemporary, historical, and biblical theories, examples and perspectives on leadership with how they relate to authority, influence, persuasion and motivation, leadership effectiveness skills in the areas of understanding organizational culture, group process, communication, and conflict resolution, leadership efficiency focusing on visioning, goal-setting, self-management, understanding of leadership styles, preferences and the learning process, and leadership empowerment and the stewardship of others.

Continued development of conducting techniques, rehearsal strategies, and repertoire selection.

A capstone course in the music and worship major. This course is an integration of theology, historical information, critical thinking, and practical skills application related to worship in culture.

A capstone course in the practical aspects of organizing, maintaining and leading a music program. Areas covered will include resources, staffing, planning, and organization skills.

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