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SUMMARY

Below is just a small sample of courses you’ll take as a Liberal Studies major at Jessup. This list is not a guide for course selection. It was created to give you a peek at the program’s academic offerings. For official program requirements, please see the current course catalog.

Core Courses (24 Units)

The following courses are part of the requirement for this major and are recommended to fulfill general education requirements.

This course enables future teachers to examine a broad overview of concepts and issues of multicultural education and the pedagogical implications for teachers in a pluralistic society. Students will learn concepts and strategies for infusing cultural understanding, tolerance, and appreciation into the K-8 classroom.

This course reviews the major philosophic and historical developments of education (California, the USA, and worldwide) through research of the key components of education in a democracy and reflection on the power of the educational process in personal, social, mental, and spiritual development. The student will be encouraged to reflect on their own developmental journey and how they can help others research their potential for success and societal improvement.

This course explores the disciplines of developmental and educational psychology in order to prepare students to apply the theories and patterns of learning, development, instruction, and individual differences as they relate to teacher practices and educational programs.

This semester-long course provides future teachers an overview of literacy development with consideration of language (both first and second) and cultural impacts on learning. Future teachers will learn historical and current concepts, theories, and practices related to the development of literacy for all students in diverse classrooms as well as the value of integrating character development within teaching.

This course will trace the political, constitutional, cultural, and socio-economic history of the United States from the colonial period to the present day. In addition, this course will also treat the political, socio-economic and cultural history of the state of California. Particular attention will be paid to the themes identified in The History – Social Science Framework of California Public Schools.

An introduction to the connection between mathematics and contemporary culture. Topics include critical thinking skills regarding mathematical information in society, some statistics and probability, mathematical models and their applications, number theory, some algebra and graphs and functions.

An introduction to the concepts and principles of physical science, covering topics of motion, force, energy, structure of matter, heat and thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and light; emphasizing conceptual understanding and using basic math to re-enforce concepts. Satisfies general education science requirements.

An overview of physical, cognitive, psychosocial, and moral development of humankind from prenatal life through old age. This class should be taken early in the student’s training as it is prerequisite to many other courses.

Liberal Studies Concentrations

Students must choose a concentration listed below.

Multiple Subject Education Concentration (36 units)

This course is designed to introduce and explore the educational pathways leading to careers for students seeking to earn their multiple subject credential, which enables them to teach grades K-8 (public and private) in a self-contained classroom setting. Students will survey curriculum practices, teacher effectiveness, and the issues and concepts related to K-8 education. Each student will complete 10 hours of required classroom observation and report on these observations in the class.

The goals of this course include: 1) introducing the skills related to planning and implementing a physical education and health program for K-8 students based on the California Physical Education and Health Content Standards and Frameworks; 2) addressing the attitudes, behaviors, and consequences associated with a healthy lifestyle; and 3) familiarizing students with age appropriate scope and sequence of activities leading to healthy physical and mental development. This course is a survey study of the physical education and health needs of K-8 students. Emphasis is on the physical growth and development, basic movement skills, and the design and planning of a sequential, age-appropriate physical education and health program based on the California Content Standards and Frameworks. Involves four hours of field experience.

This course is a comprehensive overview of the use of educational technology in the K-8 classroom. Students will practice and demonstrate competency in using professional and pedagogical productivity tools, including methods for communication and collaboration. Topics include interactive technologies, digital citizenship, computer-assisted instruction, 21st century learning, and the impact of these technologies.

This course focuses on learning the resources and tools available for teaching visual and performing arts. Hands-on development of methods for classroom use including four hours of observation/participation in a K-8 VAPA classroom and interview of a specialized VAPA educator. This course prepares teaching candidates to meet the California state adopted content standards and framework in visual and performing arts for the multiple subject credential and equips students with knowledge and methodologies for successful integration and teaching of these subjects.

Serving as a classroom assistant for 30 hours during the semester, the student will learn about the dynamics of lesson preparation and classroom instruction. The student will learn about specific pedagogical skills for subject matter instruction, the interpretation and use of assessments, making content accessible to students, developmentally appropriate teaching practices, and teaching English learners and students with special needs. Candidates will practice and prepare for the Teaching Performance Assessment (TPA) cycles in this course.

Designed to familiarize students with the resources and tools available for teaching history and social science. Hands-on development of methods for classroom use including a minimum of four hours of observation and participation in history and social science classrooms required. This course prepares teaching candidates to meet the California state adopted content standards and framework in history and social science for the multiple subject credential and equips students with knowledge and methodologies for the successful integration and teaching of these subjects.

The next step into the real world of teaching directs the student to more hands-on classroom assisting under the care of a classroom teacher. Thirty hours of classroom assisting required. This experience may not be with the same teacher, the same grade level, or the same subject used in Student Teaching I (TEDU475). Specific attention will be given to connecting instructional planning and assessment practices to student characteristics, in order to further practice and prepare for the Teaching Performance Assessment (TPA) cycles.

In this course, teaching candidates prepare to plan and deliver content specific instruction in math and science to students in K-8 classrooms that meet the California state adopted content standards and curriculum frameworks for multiple subject candidates. Candidates will learn the resources and tools available and develop hands-on methods for use in the classroom. A minimum of four hours of observation and participation in mathematics and science classrooms is required.

Students will learn the resources and tools available for teaching literature and language subjects. Hands-on methods for classroom use are developed. A minimum of four hours of observation and participation in literature and language classrooms is required. This course prepares teaching candidates to meet the California state adopted content standards and framework in literature and language for the multiple subject credential, including preparation for the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA), and equips students with knowledge and methodologies for the successful integration and teaching of these subjects.

This provides teaching experience in the day school under guidance of the University supervisor with cooperation of a credentialed master teacher in a regular school classroom. May be in a public or private school setting. (Note: Students seeking a California teaching credential must do this teaching in a public school classroom to learn about California state-adopted academic content standards.) The course is open to multiple subject credential candidates who have been cleared for student teaching. Please see the credential analyst for important dates and clearance requirements. A weekly seminar accompanies student teaching. Field experience involves eight weeks of full day classroom instruction under supervision. Teaching Performance Assessment (TPA) cycles will be prepared and submitted in this course.

Provides additional teaching experience in the day school under guidance of the University supervisor with cooperation of a credentialed master teacher in a regular school classroom. (May be public, private or charter school setting.) The course is open to multiple subject credential candidates who have completed TEDU475 student teaching. Please see the credential analyst for important dates and clearance requirements. A weekly seminar accompanies student teaching. The candidate will teach for eight weeks of full day class instruction. This experience may not be with the same teacher, the same grade level, or the same subject used in Student Teaching I (TEDU475). Appropriate Teaching Performance Assessment (TPA) cycles will be prepared and submitted in this course.

English Concentration (15 units)

ENGL160 |  Introduction to Literacy Studies
An introduction to the interpretation and analysis of literature, including novels, short stories, poetry, films, and plays. Course focuses on developing an interpretation and writing a short critical analysis paper.

ENGL286 |  Creative Writing
Introduction to creative writing, dedicated to examining and experimenting with fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry writing. Discussion of student writing and relevant literary texts. Required for creative writing concentration.

ENGL220 |  Foundations of British Literature
A survey of the foundations of British literature from ancient times through the Restoration. Includes works from Greek, Roman, Old and Middle English, the Renaissance, and the 17th and 18th centuries.

ENGL221 | British Literature since 1800
A survey of various texts and topics in British literature from 1800 to the present, such as Romanticism, the development of the novel, revolution and industrialism in literature, and the literary representation of war.

ENGL231 |  American Literature to 1865
A survey covering significant literary works in American literature from its beginnings through the end of the Civil War period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama.

ENGL232 | American Literature 1865 to Present
A survey covering significant literary works in American literature from the end of the Civil War period to present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama.

Students will learn the resources and tools available for teaching literature and language subjects. Hands-on methods for classroom use are developed. A minimum of four hours of observation and participation in literature and language classrooms is required. This course prepares teaching candidates to meet the California state adopted content standards and framework in literature and language for the multiple subject credential, including preparation for the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA), and equips students with knowledge and methodologies for the successful integration and teaching of these subjects.

History Concentration (15 units)

ENGL110 |  Literature and Culture
No course description available.

PPOL341 |  Political Economy
An introduction to the principles of micro- and macroeconomics, this course reviews both the principles of economic theory and application, as well as a comparative review of economic practices. The course includes an analysis of supply and demand, allocation of resources, and economic aggregates. The course also emphasizes the significance of economic policies as they relate to political policymaking.

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No course description available.

This course will focus on developments and trends in Europe, Asia, and the Third World during the 20th century, including various ideological movements and their consequences, post-colonialism and globalization.

Designed to familiarize students with the resources and tools available for teaching history and social science. Hands-on development of methods for classroom use including a minimum of four hours of observation and participation in history and social science classrooms required. This course prepares teaching candidates to meet the California state adopted content standards and framework in history and social science for the multiple subject credential and equips students with knowledge and methodologies for the successful integration and teaching of these subjects.

Child Development Concentration (15 units)

Students will be challenged to gain insights into the nature and needs of children from birth to age twelve and to consider ways to help them grow as disciples of Christ. They will explore issues and possibilities in church-based ministries with children, including basic philosophies of ministry and their practical implications. A portion of class sessions in the second half of the semester will feature children’s ministers working in the Sacramento area, sharing their philosophy of ministry and addressing specific topics.

A psychologically and theologically integrated study of marriage and family relationships, this course prepares students to develop a personal philosophy of family. It will include a personal evaluation of familial experiences and a challenging look at cultural norms and biblical principles. This course prepares students to develop a personal conceptualization for family development in addition to aiding others to do the same.

An in-depth look at the development of children and adolescents. Guidance and practical parenting skills as well as therapeutic interventions will be emphasized. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own development and the experiences in childhood and adolescence that have shaped their lives.

This course focuses on learning the resources and tools available for teaching visual and performing arts. Hands-on development of methods for classroom use including four hours of observation/participation in a K-8 VAPA classroom and interview of a specialized VAPA educator. This course prepares teaching candidates to meet the California state adopted content standards and framework in visual and performing arts for the multiple subject credential and equips students with knowledge and methodologies for successful integration and teaching of these subjects.

Students will learn the resources and tools available for teaching literature and language subjects. Hands-on methods for classroom use are developed. A minimum of four hours of observation and participation in literature and language classrooms is required. This course prepares teaching candidates to meet the California state adopted content standards and framework in literature and language for the multiple subject credential, including preparation for the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA), and equips students with knowledge and methodologies for the successful integration and teaching of these subjects.

Psychology Concentration (15 units)

An introduction to the study of human behavior and mental processes. The history of psychology and basic theories of learning, motivation, personality, and emotion are explored. Application of psychology to everyday living is emphasized.

Students will be introduced to the nature of persons from a Christian world view, while considering the nature and process of the application of Christian thought to the study and practice of psychology. An examination of the practice of responsible integration will be included.

PSYC222 |  Interpersonal Processes
A study of the elements of effective communication. Increasing self-awareness and improving personal effectiveness are emphasized. Consideration of cultural traditions as they impact communication styles is included.

PSYC230 |  Psychology of Relationships
An exploration of man’s relational nature as it reflects God’s relational nature. Health in a variety of relational contexts will be explored. Self-awareness as well as implications for ministry to others will be emphasized.

A study of psychopathology or abnormal behavior. Emphasis is placed on description and identification of individual disorders. A consideration of cultural differences in the expression of abnormal symptomatology is included.

PSYC203 |  Social Psychology
The study of the impact of the social context on the individual, this course examines the relationship of the individual to the family, the group, and the larger social milieu. Both theory and research findings will be examined as students analyze social behavior, including social cognition, attitude formation and change, conformity, prejudice, and group processes.

PSYC332 |  Multicultural Issues in Psychology
Students will explore cultural differences and develop greater sensitivity to these differences as they influence human behavior and mental processes. Psychological dynamics involved in the formation and reduction of prejudices, discrimination, and stereotypes will be explored.

PSYC345 |  Gender Studies
An exploration of a scriptural view of male and female identity and roles, this course is designed to expand the student’s perspective regarding gender differences and similarities. The impact of culture upon men and women socially, physically, and spiritually will be examined. Issues unique to each gender will be explored with the goal of preparing students for working more effectively with both men and women.

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Concentration (22 units)

Introduction to the field of linguistics. Students will develop an understanding of the nature of language and modern grammar through the study of core areas including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Students will have the opportunity to read, write, and think critically about related fields such as historical linguistics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, and animal communication. This course is designed for students who have a general interest in linguistics and modern grammar.

Learning another language involves numerous linguistic, social, and affective factors. Accordingly, we examine these factors in detail to raise awareness of the complicated processes involved. Some of the questions explored include: What is native language transfer? How do learner expectations influence classroom behaviors? Why is intrinsic motivation an important element of success?

This course examines several foundational approaches and methods that have contributed to current TESOL practices. Students in this course will develop the skills necessary for assessing learning environments and choosing successful approaches. Further, students will be introduced to methods of classroom research.

This course examines the processes involved in designing lesson plans, conducting activities, and selecting appropriate assessment tools. Further, we will review classroom materials and the role of information technologies in language learning.

Learning how to observe and think critically about language classrooms is an important skill in understanding what practices are effective in specific learning environments. This course challenges students to do close observations of specific classroom behaviors and to prepare short research papers of their findings.

In this course, students develop a case study of specific learners and their environment as well as plan a lesson and participate in classroom instruction. Students will be observed by the course instructor and are expected to synthesize these observations with relevant TESOL research to culminate in an action research project of their experiences.

An introduction to how culture affects the process of intercultural communication with practical experience as a high contrast cultural partnership. Understanding is the priority as students look at the vast varieties of worldviews, customs, attitudes, values, belief systems, and behaviors which culture includes. Enhanced communication of the Christian gospel is cross-culturally is one expected outcome.

ICS103 | Leading with a Mission
This course addresses the foundation for the mission Dei (mission of God) from biblical, historical, cultural, and strategic perspectives. Course content emphasizes the centrality of God’s desire to reconcile people to Himself and others, providing an overview of contemporary missional approaches.

ICS202 | Cultural Anthropology
An introduction to the science of the study of man in his cultural setting. The end in view is the gaining of a better understanding of different customs and cultures to enable more effective cross-cultural communication.

ICS320 | World Religions
This course is an objective study of world religions including Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and traditional religions. Discussions include the exclusivity of Christianity in a pluralistic society and strategic opportunities for apologetic and evangelistic engagement with adherents of other religions. Efforts are made to discover bridges of approach for sharing the uniqueness of Christ.

ICS401 | Establishing Faith Communities
No course description available.

NT210 | Acts
A comprehensive study of the Acts of the Apostles from historical, theological, missiological, and literary perspectives. The course considers the importance of Acts for our understanding of early Christianity and integrates the careers, message, and theology of the apostles with the rest of the New Testament.

ORLD430 | Leading in a Global Society
This course will explore the nature of leadership in various cultures and the skills needed in a global economy and society. Students will examine the leadership implications for cross-cultural and multi-national organizations. Students will engage in discussions of the “Great Commission” and reflect on historical aspects of global leadership. The future of global leadership will be examined and the potential leadership challenges considered. To the extent possible, students will be challenged to cultivate their own global leadership “map” as they interact with the emerging global scene.

PSYC332 | Multicultural Issues in Psychology
Students will explore cultural differences and develop greater sensitivity to these differences as they influence human behavior and mental processes. Psychological dynamics involved in the formation and reduction of prejudices, discrimination, and stereotypes will be explored.

American Sign Language Concentration (15 units)

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of American Sign Language (ASL). It provides preparation for visual/gestural communication and includes basic information relating to Deaf culture, intensive work on comprehension skills, and grammatical structures. The course includes foundational Christian signs.

This course is a continuation of American Sign Language I. It enhances the student’s proficiency in ASL usage and stresses continued development of basic conversational skills with emphasis on vocabulary and expressive skills. The course also expands vocabulary and concepts acquired in ASLSI and includes additional Christian signs.

This course is a continuation of ASLSII. The course shifts from comprehension to production of ASL. It provides further study of vocabulary and grammatical patterns and continues to develop ASL competencies in numerous conversational settings. The course brings ASL fluency to a point of self-generated ASL for the purpose of furthering language use in ASL. It expands vocabulary and concepts acquired in ASLSII and continues to expand the range of Christian signs.

ASLS261 | American Sign Language IV
This course is a continuation of ASLSII. It provides advanced study of ASL grammar and offers advanced development and refinement of ASL skills and fluency. The course includes intensive work on expressive and receptive skills using a range of weekly topics including medical, food, expanded numbers, sports and storytelling signs to name a few. It expands vocabulary and concepts acquired in ASLSII and continues to expand the range of Christian signs.

ASLS301 | Introduction to American Deaf History and Culture
This is a lecture course with no prerequisite. This is not a signing skills class. Students study the history and culture of the American Deaf community. The course comprises lectures, guest speakers, videos, and text readings. Assessments involve in-class exams, research papers, and in-class presentations.

ASLS370 | Worship and Creative Signs
In this course, students learn to sign Christian signs and creative signs beyond what is learned in ASLSI. Topics include Christian songs, hymns, prayers, poems, and biblical stories. The course also teaches students to sign in a creative way beyond basic conversational skills. Topics include signing songs, poems, skits, jokes, children’s stories, and more.

ASLS375 | Experiential Learning
This course expands the student’s knowledge of career opportunities in the field of sign language. Part of the course involves students assisting an instructor in an ASL classroom at WJU. The rest of the course is “in the field” at an appointed location of interest to the student. The objective of this course is to expand the student’s ASL skill and expose them to specific career opportunities.

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