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SUMMARY

Below is just a small sample of courses you’ll take as a Biology major at Jessup. This list is not a guide for course selection. It was created to give you a peek at the program’s academic offerings. For official program requirements, please see the current course catalog.

Major Courses (15 Units)

The following courses are part of the requirement for this major and are recommended to fulfill general education requirements.

Introduces biological principles that underlie the cellular basis of life. Course topics include biomolecules, cell structure and function, cellular energetics, molecular conveyance of information, cell division, reproduction, development, and genetic inheritance. Students will learn and apply scientific skills, approaches, and strategies to solve problems and to interpret observations in both lecture and lab. Laboratory exercises provide students with hands on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

Students are introduced to basic concepts of physics using algebraic and trigonometric techniques. Topics include Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum, conservation laws, and thermal properties of matter. Course includes a mandatory lab component. Laboratory exercises provide students with hands-on application of principles discussed in lecture. Topics include Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum, conservation laws, and thermal properties of matter.

Evaluates the scientific evidence for a creator and discusses numerous models of creation from a biblical, theological, and scientific perspective. The course will include in‐depth analysis of the creation account in Genesis, considering historical and cultural settings, important theological concepts, and how various interpretive viewpoints have contributed to current conceptual frameworks of creation. The course will also examine the scientific data in support of each of the frameworks or models of creation.

An introduction to the tools of statistics covering such topics as frequency distributions, variability, probability, and  hypothesis testing.

Core Courses (26 Units)

Introduces principles underlying the diversity and interconnectedness of living organisms. The course includes a survey of plant and animal phyla, examines the genealogical relationship between living organisms, and explores the processes that shape biodiversity. The course also covers general principles of ecology, including population dynamics and properties that define the major ecosystems. Laboratory exercises provide students with hands on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

Course is required for biology majors Evaluates nucleic acid structure and function; chromosomal structure, gene structure, expression, and regulation; replication; transcription and translation; transmission genetics; and transgenesis.

A capstone course for biology students in their senior year, Bioethics requires the integration of principles studied in the first through third year curriculum in the critical analysis of ethical issues raised by contemporary medicine and biology. Possible topics include euthanasia, abortion, reproductive technologies, genetic engineering, cloning, practitioner/patient relationships, allocation of medical resources, and experimentation on human subjects. Emphasis is on Christian perspectives and well-reasoned application of biblical principles.

CHEM105/L | Introduction to Chemistry with Lab
This is a mandatory lab component of CHEM105 and must be taken concurrently. Successful completion of this course requires passing both CHEM105 and CHEM105L with a C‐ or better in a concurrent semester. Laboratory exercises provide students with hands on applications of principles discussed in lecture. Formerly Introduction to General Chemistry Lab.

CHEM106/L | Introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry with Lab
Course includes a mandatory lab component (CHEM106L) that must be taken concurrently. Successful completion of this course requires passing both CHEM106 and CHEM106L with a C‐ or better in a concurrent semester. A study of the major classes of organic compounds, including nomenclature structure, properties, intermolecular forces, and types of reactions. This course then applies the concepts of organic chemistry to the structure and function of biomolecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, and DNA and RNA. The course is designed to meet the requirements for certain nursing, dental hygiene, physical therapy, agriculture, and forestry programs, and helps satisfy general education science requirements

CHEM110/L | General Chemistry I with Lab
Course includes a mandatory lab component (CHEM110L) that must be taken concurrently. Successful completion of this course requires passing both CHEM110 and CHEM110L with a C‐ or better in a concurrent semester. A major level course covering atomic structure, organization of the periodic table, chemical bonding, intermolecular forces, physical and chemical changes of elements and compounds, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, properties of solutions, gas laws, and thermochemistry. Intended for students planning professional school studies in medicine or graduate studies in life science .

CHEM111/L | General Chemistry II with Lab
Course includes a mandatory lab component (CHEM111L) that must be taken concurrently. Successful completion of this course requires passing both CHEM111 and CHEM111L with a C‐ or better in a concurrent semester. A continuation of CHEM110 covering kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Intended for students planning professional school studies in medicine or graduate studies in life sciences.

Students with a three or higher on the AP Calculus A/B or AP Calculus B/C exam may meet their GE mathematics requirement. However, a four or higher is required to receive credit for Calculus I. Fundamentals of calculus including functions, limits and continuity, differentiation, and integration.

Biology Concentrations

Students must choose a concentration listed below.

Human Biology Concentration (35 units)

Examines the functions of major organ systems of mammals, including man with an emphasis on underlying cellular, biochemical, and bio-physical mechanisms. Structure of organ systems are described as a basis for understanding function.

Offers a rigorous, in-depth presentation of basic principles with emphasis on stereochemistry and spectroscopy and preparations and reactions of nonaromatic hydrocarbons, haloalkanes, alcohols, ethers, aromatic hydrocarbons, and organometallic compounds. CHEM210 and CHEM211 are intended for students planning professional school studies in medicine or graduate studies in life sciences. Laboratory exercises provide students with hands on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

Continues the CHEM210 series with emphasis on the preparation, reactions, and identification of aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, alkyl and acyl amines, ß-dicarbonyl compounds, and various classes of naturally occurring, biologically important compounds. Laboratory exercises provide students with hands on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

Incorporates discussions on water and biological buffers, thermodynamics of metabolism, structure and function of biomolecules, enzyme kinetics and function, and membrane biology with modern laboratory methods for the separation, purification, identification and biological evaluation of organic compounds. Laboratory exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

MATH141 | Calculus 2
Continues in topics of calculus including integrals and transcendental functions, techniques of integration, first order differential equations, infinite sequence and series, and parametric equations.

MATH320 | Probability Theory
Discrete and continuous probability including conditional probability; independence and Bayes’ Theorem; expected value, variance, and moments of a random variable; distributions, methods for identifying distributions, and the Central Limit Theorem; and statistical hypothesis testing, errors, correlation, regression equations, and analysis of variance.

Students are introduced to basic concepts of physics using algebraic and trigonometric techniques. Topics include waves, electricity, magnetism, and light. Course includes a mandatory lab component. Laboratory exercises provide students with hands-on application of principles discussed in lecture. Topics include waves, electricity, magnetism, and light.

Pre-Allied Health Concentration (34 units)

Addresses the fundamentals of human nutrition with emphasis on the body’s utilization of food nutrients and disease processes associated with malnutrition. The course includes defining strategies to empower student to reach their personal health and fitness goals. While appropriate for non-science majors, this course is recommended for students interested in the scientific approach to the study of nutrition.

Examines structure, relationships among structures, and histology of the human body through a rigorous study of human anatomy. Laboratory exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture. Cadavers and/or animal organ systems are utilized in the laboratory

Explores the function, regulation, and homeostasis of systems in the human body. Experiments on nonliving systems, blood and circulation, muscle, nervous system and sense organs, ion balance and fluid environment, endocrines, respiration, and digestion. Laboratory exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

Surveys a diverse spectrum of microorganisms, particularly bacteria and viruses, and emphasizes the interaction of microbes with humans and their role in disease. Topics include microscopy, the immune system, food microbiology, microbial pathogens, and mechanisms of disease transmission.

Introduces the biochemical and physiological bases of metabolism of protein, fat and carbohydrate; the biological role of vitamins and minerals; nutrient requirements during the life cycle; assessment of dietary intake and nutritional status.

An overview of physical, cognitive, psychosocial, and moral development of humankind from prenatal life through old age. This class should be taken early in the student’s training as it is prerequisite to many other courses.

This course is a comprehensive study of the neuroanatomy correlates of behavior as seen in the interplay of structure and function: cellular and systemic biological integration, molecular biology, epigenetics, advances in imaging technology, plasticity, and the big-picture emphasis of normal and abnormal behavior correlation. Students will delve deeper into such questions as: why do we have a brain, and how did God design it? How is the nervous system organized? How do drugs affect our behavior? How does the brain learn? How does the brain think?

Marine Biology Concentration (35 units)

This course surveys life in the oceans, from coastal ecosystems such as coral reefs and kelp forests to the expansive open ocean. Students will learn to use the scientific method in the sea to discover marine processes, organisms, and ecosystems. This course surveys microscopic plankton, marine invertebrates, fish and marine mammals as well as the ecological principles that determine their distribution. The course also examines human impacts impacting our oceans today. Laboratory exercises and field trips to the California coast provide students with hands on opportunities to discover marine organisms, ecosystems and processes.

Appropriate for non-science majors. This course examines the dynamic nature of the earth’s oceans. Students apply the scientific method to the study of physical conditions and processes within the ocean, realizing how physical oceanography impacts life in the sea. While covering the nature of ocean waves, tides, and currents, this course will stress the interdisciplinary nature of oceanography, identifying links to biology, chemistry, geology, physics, meteorology, astronomy, ecology, history, economics and public policy. Laboratory exercises provide students with opportunities to study physical conditions and processes within the oceans.

The course examines the interrelationships between organisms and their environment. Topics include organismal, population, community, ecosystem, landscape, and conservation ecology. Topics on evolution, natural selection, and adaptation are also included. Students are further provided with experiential learning opportunities in ecological field techniques. Field exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

The course examines the interrelationships of freshwater and marine organisms with their environment. Topics also include exploring the anatomy, physiology, evolution, ecology, and conservation of aquatic and marine organisms. Laboratory and field exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

This course covers the scientific study of various fish species, including bony fish, cartilaginous fish and jawless fish. Students will examine the taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology and conservation of fish in both freshwater and marine ecosystems. Lab and field exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture. Fields trips are required. Alternative assignments for field trips may be provided at the discretion of the instructor in special circumstances.

This course provides a survey of principles and techniques involved in the study of oceans and marine biology. Students will review techniques and methods in the scientific literature and the classroom in preparation for hands-on experience in the field and marine lab. Several field trips are required throughout the course. Laboratory exercises and field trips to the California coast and active marine laboratories provide students opportunities to observe and utilize methodologies and equipment relevant to the study of marine systems and processes.

Appropriate for junior or senior students in the Marine Biology concentration. This course offers a program of activity that will provide practical experience in the marine science field. Students will identify a desirable internship opportunity, and complete a program of field and/or lab research, data analysis, assigned tasks, and written reports. In conjunction, seminars offer an opportunity for students to compare, contrast, analyze, and evaluate their experience with other students in the biological sciences. This course can be taken for one to four units with approval of major advisor.

General Biology Concentration (35 units)

The course examines the interrelationships between organisms and their environment. Topics include organismal, population, community, ecosystem, landscape, and conservation ecology. Topics on evolution, natural selection, and adaptation are also included. Students are further provided with experiential learning opportunities in ecological field techniques. Field exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

Can include BIOL475. Must include at least one lab.

*Students must complete a minimum of 36 units of upper division course work in order to graduate. To meet this requirement, some or all of the nine units of free electives taken for this concentration may need to be at the upper division level.

Environmental Science Concentration (34 units)

An introduction to the concepts and principles of earth and the environment including topics in atmospheric science, geology, and ecology. It is a study of the earth and the intertwined processes that shape it. Spatial locations and relationships between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and solid earth will be examined, along with the earth’s position in space and the solar system and universe. An overview of a biblically-based environmental ethic is also included. Laboratory exercises provide students with practical applications of principles discussed in lecture.

The course examines the interrelationships between organisms and their environment. Topics include organismal, population, community, ecosystem, landscape, and conservation ecology. Topics on evolution, natural selection, and adaptation are also included. Students are further provided with experiential learning opportunities in ecological field techniques. Field exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

Can include BIOL475. Must include at least one lab.

*Students must complete a minimum of 36 units of upper division course work in order to graduate. To meet this requirement, some or all of the nine units of free electives taken for this concentration may need to be at the upper division level.

*Students must complete a minimum of 36 units of upper division course work in order to graduate. To meet this requirement, some or all of the nine units of free electives taken for this concentration may need to be at the upper division level.

ESCI312/L | Ornithology
This course examines topics on the biology and conservation of wild birds. Topics include avian ecology, origin and evolution, phylogeny, distribution, migration, behavior, reproduction, anatomy, and physiology. Emphasis is placed on experiential learning in the field. Exercises provide students with hands-on training in techniques for surveying birds and in the analysis of data collected from the field. Emphasis is placed on exploring the diversity of California birds.

ESCI313/L | Aquatic and Marine Ecology
The course examines the interrelationships of freshwater and marine organisms with their environment. Topics also include exploring the anatomy, physiology, evolution, ecology, and conservation of aquatic and marine organisms. Laboratory and field exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

ESCI314/L | Botany 
A study of the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of vascular plants. Emphasis is given to exploring California plant diversity and identification in the field. Methods for surveying and analyzing plant community data are also covered. Laboratory and field exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

ESCI320/L | Environmental Chemistry
The course covers topics on the chemistry of the environment, including the atmosphere, soil, and water. Topics include the fate of pollutants, water quality, air pollution, energy, climate, soil chemistry, and hazardous and solid waste disposal. Laboratory and field exercises provide students with hands-on applications of principles discussed in lecture.

BIOL356/L | Ichthyology
This course covers the scientific study of various fish species, including bony fish, cartilaginous fish and jawless fish. Students will examine the taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology and conservation of fish in both freshwater and marine ecosystems.

ESCI360 | Environmental Law and Policy
The course examines state and federal laws, regulations, policies, and the agencies that govern the use of environmental resources on public and private lands. Students will consider the impact of these laws locally, nationally, and globally. Students will also explore the process of environmental assessment and environmental impact statements under the National Environmental Policy Act.

*May include Internship (BIOL/ESCI475) or Research Assistantship (BIOL/ESCI497)

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