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SUMMARY

Below is just a small sample of courses you’ll take as a Biblical Studies major at Jessup. This list is not a guide for course selection. It was created to give you a peek at the program’s academic offerings. For official program requirements, please see the current course catalog.

Major Courses (42 Units)

The following courses are part of the Foundational Bible and major requirements.

This course acquaints students with aspects of daily life in the world of ancient Israel, primarily through the study of its geographical, historical, and cultural contexts. It also prepares students to identify how context influences and illuminates the text and events of the Hebrew Bible.

This course acquaints students with aspects of daily life in the first century Greco-Roman world, primarily through the study of its geographical, historical, and cultural contexts. This course prepares students to interpret how context influences and illuminates the text and events of the New Testament.

This course offers practical ways for how one can cultivate his or her relationship with Christ while pursuing a ministry and/or vocation of studying and teaching God’s word. The student will discover and practice spiritual disciplines and develop a personalized vision for their own formation so that the whole person (both body and soul) will be prepared for a life of knowing Christ and making him known.

This course introduces students to some of the current research and trends in the fields of biblical and theological studies by teaching students how to critically read, interpret and critique journal articles in these respective disciplines.

The Capstone experience is designed to help Biblical Studies and Theology students synthesize and integrate all that has been learned up to this point in their educational journeys. The class guides the students through developing a thesis grounded in careful and contextual exegesis of Scripture, informed by current research in the fields of biblical and/or theological studies, attentive to its implications for biblical theology and/or historical theology, and relevant for the present life and witness of the Church.

The first year courses of Koine Greek are designed to give students the needed foundational knowledge of Greek grammar, including phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary development. In all this, students will be working toward acquiring and deepening their facility in reading and interpreting the Greek New Testament.

These courses introduce students to biblical Hebrew morphology, grammar, and syntax. Students will become proficient in reading aloud from the Hebrew Bible, define frequently attested vocabulary, and employ Hebrew language tools in order to faithfully interpret and translate the biblical text.

Students will examine and evaluate the distinctive theological themes of the Hebrew Bible, such as creation, covenant, liberation, theodicy, and law. The course provides a critical analysis of these major theological developments and reviews some key historical and contemporary Hebrew Bible theologians and their contributions to the interpretation of the Hebrew Bible.

In this course students examine and evaluate the distinctive theological themes of the New Testament, such as kingdom, faith, atonement, theosis, eschatology, the Holy Spirit, and the Church. The course provides a critical analysis of these major theological developments, and reviews some key historical and contemporary New Testament theologians and their contributions to the interpretation of the New Testament.

Biblical Studies Concentrations

Students must choose a concentration listed below.

Archaeology Concentration (12 units)

An introduction to the study of archeology and an overview of the discipline. Students will learn how to uncover and understand ancient civilizations and long extinct societies. Students will rediscover the past and see how it is connected to the present.

This course will examine how archaeology and historical data are used to interpret the Hebrew Bible. Archaeological methods and resources in the lands of the Bible will be introduced, as well as an overview of archaeological data from the Late Bronze Age through the Persian Period. A diverse selection of texts from the Hebrew Bible and its archaeological contexts will be discussed.

This course will examine how archaeology and historical data are used to interpret the New Testament. Archaeological methods and resources in the lands of the Bible will be introduced, as well as an overview of archaeological data from the Exile to the Muslim Conquest. A diverse selection of texts from the New Testament and its archaeological contexts will be discussed.

This course will introduce the student to the archaeology and material culture of the lands of the Bible. Basic principles, techniques, and theories of ancient southern Levantine archaeology will be acquired as students participate in a field school in Israel for 4 weeks in the summer.

Pastoral Ministry Concentration (12 units)

This course explores and examines (in light of Scripture) various contemporary models of the Church, highlighting key forces that shape contemporary church and ministry. Emphasis is placed on church nature, growth and reproduction, drawing applications and tools for present-day leaders in formal and para-church settings.

Deals with counseling issues most common to the local master: premarital and family counseling, death, loss, and other crises. The emphasis is on informal, short-term methods. Preparation for a role in counseling, weddings, funerals, baptisms, and other pastoral situations of Christian ministry.

This is a course of study about the exegesis and exposition of the epistles of the New Testament. A method of both researching epistolary texts and communicating them expositionally in contemporary venues will be explored and implemented. Attention will also be paid to the place of prayer and the practice of the principles of spiritual authority in the character development of the expositor.

This course specifically addresses the complex issues of organizational development and organizational behavior. It guides students to understand the dynamics behind organizational life and health and examines the critical facets of strategic planning and tactical planning within an organization.

This course delves into the interior life of the leader. It examines the emotional, social, and spiritual life of the leader, giving attention to pathways towards an integrated inner-life. It also analyzes the role of emotional quotient (EQ) in leadership and ways to develop strength in this area.

This course addresses the foundation for the mission Dei (mission of God) from biblical, historical, cultural, and strategic perspectives. Course content emphasizes the centrality of God’s desire to reconcile people to Himself and others, providing an overview of contemporary missional approaches.

Youth Ministry Concentration (12 units)

An introduction to the field of study in ministry to adolescents. Students develop a biblical philosophy of ministry. Emphasis is given to the private and the professional aspects of this specific profession. Private issues include spiritual disciplines, health, family relationships, and personality type. Professional issues center on ethics, integrity, job skills, and leadership styles. An examination of contemporary career opportunities for church and parachurch ministries is included along with the tools to begin developing a philosophy of youth ministry.

This course equips students to teach lessons from the Bible, use and/or develop curriculum, understand the “scope and sequence” of teaching, and practice speaking in different ministry settings. Attention is given to enhancing the creative process, understanding the faith development of teenagers, and leading small groups effectively.

Youth Ministry Skills is a practical class covering the most basic programming that makes up a successful ministry to adolescents. These skills include, but are not limited to, time management, organizing a ministry calendar, designing and running camps and retreats, publicity and promotion, involvement with missions and service projects, evangelism to youth, creating budgets, developing student leaders, understanding and using technology, and more. A retreat planned by and for the students of the class culminates the learning experience.

A study of the social and cultural forces shaping the experience of adolescence in contemporary America. Students learn to evaluate individual elements of youth culture, analyze the cultural systems that shape young people, and develop effective strategies for cultural engagement. Emphasis is given to understanding the variety of current family structures and the development of enrichment programs designed to strengthen and equip families.

This course provides an exploration of strategies and techniques for counseling adolescents. The class examines the needs and problems of normal and troubled adolescents including self-image, sexuality, eating disorders, suicide, and depression. Attention is given to recognizing warning signs and understanding the referral process.

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